Sunday, 17 March 2013

Nice Girl Wallpaper

Source(google.com.pk)
Nice Girl Wallpaper Biography 
“The Yellow Wallpaper” provided feminist the tools on how to interpret literature in different ways. Lanser says the novel was a “ particularly congenial medium for such a re-vision…because the narrator herself engages in a form of feminist interpretation when she tries to read the paper on her wall”.[8] The narrator in the story is trying to find a single meaning in the wallpaper. At first she focuses on contradictory style of the wallpaper, it is “flamboyant” and also “dull” , “pronounced” yet also “lame” and “uncertain” (p. 13). She takes into account the patterns and tries to geometrically organize them but she is further confused. The wallpaper changes colors when light reflects and notices a distinct odor in which she cannot recognize (p. 25). At night the narrator within the complicated design of the wallpaper is able to see a women behind bars. Lanser argues that narrator was able to find “a space of text on which she can locate whatever self-projection”.[8] Lanser creates a relationship between the narrator and the reader. Just like the narrator as a reader, when one comes into contact with a confusing and complicated text, on tries to find one single meaning. “How we were taught to read” as Lanser puts it, is why a reader cannot fully comprehend the text.[8] The patriarchal ideology has kept many scholar from being able to interpret and appreciate novels such as “The Yellow Wallpaper”. Thanks to feminist criticism “The Yellow Wallpaper” has become a fundamental reading in standard curriculum. Feminists have made a great contribution to the study of literature but according to Lanser, are falling short because, “we acknowledge the participation of women writers and readers in dominant patterns of thought and social practice then perhaps our own patterns must also be deconstructed if we are to recover meanings still hidden or overlooked.[8]

Martha J. Cutter in her article "The Writer as Doctor: New Models of Medical Discourses in Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Later Fiction" discusses how in many of Charlotte Perkins Gilman's works she addresses this "struggle in which a male-dominated medical establishment attempts to silence women" (Cutter 1). Gilman's works challenge the social construction of women in patriarchal medical discourse by displaying women as “silent, powerless, and passive” who refuse treatment. At the time in which her works take place, between 1840 and 1890, women were exceedingly defined as lesser than—sickly and weak. In this time period it was thought that “hysteria” (a disease stereotypically more common in women) was a result of too much education. It was understood that women who spent time in college or studying were over-stimulating their brains and consequently leading themselves into states of hysteria. In fact, many of the diseases recognized in women were seen as the result of a lack of self-control or self-rule. Different physicians argued that a physician must “assume a tone of authority” and that the idea of a “cured” woman is one who is “subdued, docile, silent, and above all subject to the will and voice of the physician” (Cutter 3). A hysterical woman is one who craves power and in order for her to be treated for her hysteria, she must submit to her physician whose role is to undermine her desires. Oftentimes women were prescribed bed rest as a form of treatment, which was meant to “tame” them and basically keep them imprisoned. Treatments such as this were a way of ridding women of rebelliousness and forcing them to conform to social roles. In her works Gilman highlights that the harm caused by these types of treatments for woman i.e. “the rest cure” has to do with the way in which her voice is silenced. Paula Treichler explains "In this story diagnosis 'is powerful and public...It is a male voice that...imposes controls on the female narrator and dictates how she is to perceive and talk about the world.' Diagnosis covertly functions to empower the male physician's voice and disempower the female patent's". The narrator in “The Yellow Wallpaper” is not allowed to participate in her own treatment or diagnosis and is completely forced to succumb to everything in which her doctor and in this particular story, her husband, says. The male voice is the one in which forces controls on the female and decides how she is allowed to perceive and speak about the world around her.
Gilman's interpretation
Charlotte Perkins Gilman used her writing to express herself in a time when contradicting ideas of “True Womanhood” and “Women’s Rights” existed. Her writing’s purpose was to work toward her own rights as well as women’s rights on the whole. Through her various roles in society including author, philosopher, socialist, and feminist, Gilman embodied the fight to progress from true woman to free woman. As both woman and author, she observed the role of women in society through a critical lens. Gilman analyzed the mental decline and breakdown of women from factors including the lack of a life outside of the home, the oppressive forces of the patriarchal society, and the absence of progression due to the dominant concept of a woman’s sphere of the household. Through her work laying the foundation of contemporary women’s literature, Gilman paved the way for future writers such as Alice Walker and Sylvia Plath.  [9]
In “The Yellow Wallpaper” Gilman portrays the main character’s insanity as a way to protest the medical and professional oppression against women at the time. While under the impression that husbands and male doctors were acting with their best interests in mind, women were being depicted as mentally weak and fragile. At the time, Women’s rights advocates believed that the outbreak of women being diagnosed as mentally ill was the manifestation of their setbacks regarding the roles they were allowed to play in a male-dominated society. Women were even discouraged from writing, because their writing would ultimately create an identity, and become a form of defiance for them. Charlotte Perkins Gilman realized that writing became one of the only forms of existence for women at a time where they had very few rights.[9]

From the age of six, Emma knew that she wanted to be an actress and, for a number of years, she trained at the Oxford branch of Stagecoach Theatre Arts, a part-time theatre school where she studied singing, dancing and acting. By the age of ten, she had performed and taken the lead in various Stagecoach productions and school plays, including "Arthur: The Young Years" and "The Happy Prince". In 1999, casting began for Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001), the film adaptation of British author J.K. Rowling's bestselling novel. Casting agents found Emma through her Oxford theatre teacher, and the producers of the film were impressed by her confidence and her natural acting abilities. After eight consistent auditions, producer David Heyman told Emma and fellow applicants, Daniel Radcliffe and Rupert Grint, that they had been cast for the roles of the three leads, Hermione Granger, Harry Potter and Ron Weasley. It has even been said that Rowling had Emma as her first choice for Hermione Granger since her first screen test.
The release of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001) was Emma's cinematic screen debut. The film broke records for opening-day sales and opening-weekend takings and was the highest-grossing film of 2001. Critics praised the film and the performances of the three leading young actors, often singling out Emma in particular. The highly distributed British newspaper, 'The Daily Telegraph', called her performance "admirable" and multimedia news website, 'IGN', stated that she "stole the show". Later, Emma was nominated for five awards for her performance in the film, winning the Young Artist Award for Leading Young Actress in a Feature Film.
Since the release of the first film of the highly successful franchise, Emma has quickly become one of the most talented and recognizable young actresses in the world. She continued to play the role of Hermione Granger for nearly ten years, in all of the following Harry Potter films (Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (2002), Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004), Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005), Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007), Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2009), Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (2010), and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (2011)) as well as branch out into other films such as My Week with Marilyn (2011) and The Perks of Being a Wallflower (2012). With a successful acting and modeling career under her belt, and a soon-to-be college degree, Emma Watson is a lovely, confiden

Biography – Neha Sharma the beautiful eyed Bihari girl went to Mount Carmel School in Bhagalpur. She induced herself in the fashion world with her fashion designing course from NIFT, New Delhi. The fashion designing girl plunged into the Filmy world with her debut Telegu Movie Chirutha (2007). The Telegu Movie produced and directed by Ashwini Dutt and Puri Jagannadh also had Ram Charan Teja, son of Chiranjeevi as a debutant.  The leggy model Neha got involved in various gossips with the hero of the movie. The film though was not a Box Office blockbuster earned her fame.
Some sources murmur the fact that the involvement with Ram Charan Teja held her back for a short span from signing new films. She denying all the candy floss gossip took the role of Hema for her next Telegu film Kurradu starring Varun Sandesh opposite her. The film was a remake of Polladhavan.
The Telegu actress after her venture into Tollywood was greatly in demand for her beautiful eyes and dance. Her beauty paved her way smooth for Bollywood. She did her debut by Bhatt’s movie Crook (2010). Her performance was highly appreciated and she bagged herself a new movie Buddha Hoga Tera Baaap which had BIG B playing the lead and was a production of the house of AB Corps. Though the film was not a huge success critics were nice mouthed about her performance.
The next role she took in hand was as Meera for Teri Meri Kahaani starring Shahid Kapoor and Piggy Chops as leads. She played a cameo role essaying the initial love interest of Shahid Kapoor in one of the Eras in which the film is divided. The movie banged a mixed response from the critics.
The gritty fashionista has taken up a new film Kya Super Kool Hain Hum starring Ritesh Deshmukh, Tushar Kapoor, Sarah Jane Dias, Chunkey Pandey,and Anupam Kher. The film is said to hit the theatres on 27th July 2012. The film is a sequel of Kya Kool Hain Hum. The film is a laughter riot and is hoped to dash the silver screen with a burning bash. Like its predecessor it also promises breathtaking fun and suspense.

Some sources disclose that the gorgeous damsel has made up her mind to pursue her career in Telegu movies for some language related issues. Some enlighten the fact that her two Telegu projects upheld her confidence to express her talent in Bollywood world. She loves reading, cooking, dancing and has specialized in Katthak, Jazz and Salsa. She aims to be a successful actress in life and open her own cloth brand someday in the future. She takes inspiration from Kate Moss for her hair styling. This actress is widely famed for her attractive eyes.
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Each moment of the year has its own beauty . . . a picture which was never before and shall never be seen again.
Flowers are like human beings . . . they thrive on a little kindness.After a thundershower, the weather takes a pledge and signs it with a rainbow. - Thomas Bailey
There is nothing more beautiful than a rainbow - but it takes both rain and sunshine to make one. If life is to be rounded and many-colored, like a rainbow, both joy and sorrow must come to it.
From the age of six, Emma knew that she wanted to be an actress and, for a number of years, she trained at the Oxford branch of Stagecoach Theatre Arts, a part-time theatre school where she studied singing, dancing and acting. By the age of ten, she had performed and taken the lead in various Stagecoach productions and school plays, including "Arthur: The Young Years" and "The Happy Prince". In 1999, casting began for Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001), the film

Nice Girl Wallpaper
Nice Girl Wallpaper
Nice Girl Wallpaper
Nice Girl Wallpaper
Nice Girl Wallpaper
Nice Girl Wallpaper
Nice Girl Wallpaper
Nice Girl Wallpaper
Nice Girl Wallpaper
Nice Girl Wallpaper
Nice Girl Wallpaper

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